How about building habits together?


#21

You spend too much time in the company of washed up middle aged freelancers. Be around people of your own age - offline, not online and definitely avoid the social media, play a sport, chase girls, go to a gym, brush up your calculus, learn to code, join a proper engineering college. Don’t waste your youth.

What you’ve got right - Starting your own web design business. Very good. You are probably better at web programming than most people of your age. Develop your skills. Coding is going to be the most valuable skill anyone can have in 4 or 5 years time.


#22


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#24


#25

Who could resist such a warm, friendly “welcome back!”? :rofl:


#26

It turns out, that I am middle aged too. Sorry, I don’t have any time left, I should go change the diapers of my grandchildren. :frowning:


#27

Middle aged is too young for grandchildren, unless both you and your kids got their babies really early (well, really early for our culture).


#28

We have some great-grandparents families in the UK where great-grandmother is ~45 :slight_smile: (often the same kind of parent who is “best friends” with their daughter in a “let’s hit the nightclub!” way)


#29

Great-grandparents? So, having kids at 15? We have similar families here, too, but it’s rare (it’s a bit more common among the Roma population). :slight_smile:


#30

No, as in the mother of the granny of the mother of the child [I probably messed that up]. So in that neat little example, x3 generations have given birth to their potential best friend ever 1.5 decades. They should, at least, be applauded for remarkable efficiency. It isn’t all that common, but sometimes there will be a non-news story in the tabloids (usually when the teenager is pregnant, with an interview where they say things like “My mum had me when she was 12, and it hasn’t done me any harm” and “we’re the best of friends and we share everything”).

Of course, they get paid, and it’s debatable whether they realize that they’re really just fodder for tabloid readers to purse their lips at (“the moral decline of this country is shocking!!”) So long as they are happy and bring up their children well, I don’t really care.

The other variety is, of course, women in their mid-40s with about 50 children (and also, I imagine a lot of headaches and bills)


#31

There was a famous singer in Serbia who had, well, not 50 children, but many (some of them were her biological kids, and some were adopted). She was really popular, so I doubt that she had financial troubles because of that, and she was definitely happy with her kids. :slight_smile:


#32

What is it with famous singers/actors and adopted children? I don’t know about your singer, of course, but hopefully her adoptees don’t come with a little :face_with_raised_eyebrow: as to whether they’re dong this for the PR or because they just really love children (in a nice way, I feel I ought to add).


#33

I’m sure some do it for PR. This one did it because she really loved children and wanted to help them (and was also able to help them). I only found out about the whole thing when I read the news about her death, so I doubt that it was PR with her.


#34

Yup, that’s definitely a good indicator that she was a good 'un. RIP nice Serbian singer lady.


#35

Шешељва-радикална идеологија бвачо!

Which one? I know Esma had a lot of children. If I am correct all of them were adopted.


#36

I’ve just checked it… No kids of her own, but 48 adopted. She was very poor as a kid, and also had trouble because she’s Romani.

@TheFreaky, yes, Esma.

@Locusta, this one is in Serbian, but you can see what she looked like:


#37

Yep, Esma was a great person, there are many stories about her. She lived in the gypsy part of town in Skopje (if I am correct).

I didn’t know that many Serbians respected her. In Macedonia, many were making fun out of her.

For those of you that don’t know about Esma. Sacha Baron Cohen used her song for the intro of Borat.


#38

I’m not sure whether they’ve respected her (Romani, racists, you get the picture), but I’ve known about her my entire life. Heck, everyone knew about her. I’ve checked the stories about her again, and only now realized that she actually lived in Macedonia, not in Serbia (so you can guess how familiar she felt, I thought she lived here). :slight_smile: A great person, really. :slight_smile:


#39

I quite like that song. I do quite like generic Eastern European/Turkish/Greek pop music though. It’s funky AF.

48 adopted kids, huh? That’s quite the handful! I can see how her past might have made her want to share her fortune with other and give them a better life, too.